Monthly Archives: October 2018

Pacquiao: There will be a rematch

Rematch over retirement.

Manny Pacquiao guaranteed a return bout with Jeff Horn Monday night, shelving calls to end a sterling ring career outright.

“There’s a rematch,” Pacquiao said after having late dinner at his mansion h

Beaten by Horn in their showdown for the World Boxing Organization welterweight crown Sunday in Brisbane,
Pacquiao wants to exact revenge on the Australian, who roughed him up to earn a disputable unanimous
decision.

On Monday, however, when Horn was being feted in his hometown, he announced that if ever there will be a rematch, it should be held again n Brisbane.

Owing to the tremendous success of “Battle in Brisbane,” which reportedly enriched the city coffers by $25 million aside from gaining worldwide attention, Brisbane officials have endorsed Pacquiao-Horn II.

Informed of the development, Pacquiao said he won’t mind returning to Suncorp Stadium to seek revenge on Horn.

“Even in Brisbane, no problem,” said Pacquiao, who’s out for revenge. “There will be talks.”

One of the chief concerns is when will the bout be staged.

The original timetable is for Pacquiao to fight in November, but it still hinges on Pacquiao’s work as a senator and how swift negotiations between the Pacquiao camp and Horn’s handlers will be done.

Side issues include the fighters’ purses and the event’s coverage.

In the first fight, Pacquiao reportedly got $10 M and Horn $500,000. ESPN aired “Battle of Brisbane” on free television and posted viewership record.

Back at home with his children, Pacquiao said he would rest for a while the Senate is on break. “I’ll relax first.”

But once the rematch deal is signed, Pacquiao will get to work and put his aging body in the best shape possible.

With his legacy secured, 11-time world champion in an unprecedented eight divisions, Pacquiao said it would be easy for him to walk away.

Closing his career, with a loss however, is unacceptable for Pacquiao. If he retires, it should be on a winning note.

Horn said during the post-fight conference Sunday that he is willing to give Pacquiao a chance to regain the 147-pound crown anywhere, including the Philippines.

 

Olympic swimming medalists

Lilly King set an American record in the women’s 50-meter breaststroke, three other swimmers had the fastest times in the world this season and two more broke national championship records at the U.S. titles on Thursday.

Each has even bigger plans for next month’s world championships in Hungary.

“I’m always happy to get an American record, but I was hoping to go a little faster,” King said after posting a time of 29.66 seconds. “I’ve think I’ve still got a little left in the tank for Budapest.”

She’ll have almost three weeks to prepare after breaking the record Jessica Hardy held for nearly eight years by 0.14. King also could be heading to Hungary with the No. 1 time in the event this year after passing her Russian rival Yulia Efimova, who started the day in the No. 1 spot with a time of 29.88.

Katie Meili, an Olympic gold medalist like King, finished in 30.11

King has qualified in two individual events and the Indiana University star will chase her third win in three nights when she competes in her specialty, the 100 back Friday.

She was only part of the speedy equation in Indianapolis, though.

The U.S. men produced world-best times in three of the night’s four events and set a championship record in the other one.

Chase Kalisz started the impressive run in the men’s 400 individual medley, finishing in 4:06.99 — the first sub 4:07 in the world in 2017. Second-place finisher Jay Litherland, Kalisz’s teammate at Georgia, wound up second in 4:09.31, No. 4 in the world.

Event winners automatically qualify for the U.S. team. The runner-ups must wait for the selection process to end before finding out if they make the team.

Caeleb Dressel took the men’s 100 butterfly, winning in 50.87 to become the first swimmer to crack the 51-second mark this year. Twenty-six-year old Tim Phillips was second in 51.30, the third-fastest time in the world.

Dressel has qualified in three individual events for the worlds — the 100 free and the 50 and 100 fly, where he’s like to square off with rival Joseph Schooling of Singapore.

Kevin Cordes set a championship record by beating Andrew Wilson with a time of 26.88 in the men’s 50 breast, No. 3 in the world, and 19-year-old Justin Ress closed it out with another world-best performance in the 50 backstroke. He beat two Olympic gold medalists, Ryan Murphy and Matt Grevers, with a time of 24.41 — and surpassed China’s Xu Jiayu for the No. 1 spot.

Leah Smith, who finished second to Katie Ledecky in races each of the first two nights, finally won the women’s 400 IM in 4:33.86. It was third on the international list. Elizabeth Beisel wound up taking second in 4:38.55 after Ella Eastin was disqualified for a bad turn coming out of the backstroke.

Soccer superstar of Cristiano Ronaldo

He has given no other information about the twins or their mother, but unconfirmed reports from Portuguese TV channel SIC say that they were born in the U.S. last Thursday through a surrogate and have been named Eva and Mateo.

Ronaldo posted on Facebook to say that he was “body and soul” in the service of his national team despite the birth of his sons. “I’m very happy, finally, to be with my children for the first time,” he said.

The Portugal captain’s firstborn child, Cristiano Ronaldo Jnr, was born to an anonymous American woman in 2010. A picture he added to Instagram in May also led to speculation that his long-term girlfriend, Georgina Rodríguez, is expecting.

The Real Madrid striker made the announcement hours after his Portugal team was kicked out of the Confederations Cup on penalties by Chile.

Golfer Michael Buttacavoli withdrew from chance at US Open after his clubs misplaced

To compete in the qualifying rounds for the US Open, you sort of need your golf clubs—which is why one pro golfer is fuming at American Airlines for his now-squashed chances to make the cut. USA Today reports Michael Buttacavoli withdrew Monday from his last chance to play in the Open’s sectional qualifiers after the airline couldn’t track down a bag containing his clubs with priority tags. The 29-year-old, who’s on the PGA Tour Latinoamerica roster, had flown on a red-eye from Ecuador to Miami and was dismayed to find that even though he made it to his early-morning tee time at Florida’s Jupiter Hills Club, his clubs had gone missing, per Golf.com. “Thank u @AmericanAir,” a frustrated Buttacavoli sarcastically tweeted just before 6am local time Monday, letting the airline know he had to pull out of the competition.

AA offered to help track the bag down in a responding tweet, but Buttacavoli noted that ship had sailed. “It’s too late,” he retorted. “I already withdrew. You just needed to do your job in the first place.” The airline tried to apologize, saying, “This wasn’t the experience we had planned for you,” but Buttacavoli was having none of it. “Stop apologizing. Don’t need sympathy or u to be PC. Just do better,” he tweeted. He added it was too late to rent a set by the time he realized his clubs weren’t going to show up, though Golf Digest, which reports that Buttacavoli has made it to the sectional qualifying rounds three times before (but never to the Open itself), notes Buttacavoli could have asked his brother, who was caddying for him, to bring his own set. “It’s a challenge enough to qualify with your own golf clubs,” he says. American Airlines did eventually find his bag.

2 German Triumphs

Germany’s players were still embracing on the field, some minutes away from lifting the Confederations Cup trophy, when the congratulatory messages started to pour in. They came from some of the country’s most famous, most decorated players, winners of the World Cup and the Champions League: Mesut Özil, Toni Kroos, Jérôme Boateng and a host of others.

Some, like Kroos, expressed their delight at Germany’s defeat of Chile in St. Petersburg — victory in the country’s first appearance in what may yet be the last iteration of this tournament — without words, communicating their happiness instead exclusively through emojis.

Other players were only a little more garrulous. “How great is that?” asked Mats Hummels. “What a triumph, what a squad,” said Ilkay Gundogan. Thomas Müller advised his countrymen, presumably based on his own experiences, to make sure they “have fun while celebrating.”

None of those players were on the field in Russia, waiting to take to the podium. Like Manuel Neuer, Sami Khedira, Marco Reus, Julian Weigl, André Schürrle and many others, they had not been included in Joachim Löw’s squad for the competition. They were all watching, from home or from holiday, as their country proved its soccer resources run so deep, so wide, that it can triumph without them.

As Löw was quick to point out as he reflected on Germany’s victory, winning the Confederations Cup, even with “such a young side,” does not mean that the Germans, the current World Cup champions, are certain to retain their crown when they return to Russia next summer. Nor does the European Championship won by its under-21 team last week in Poland mean that Germany can be assured of success in the senior continental tournaments in 2020 or 2024.

Major competitions do not subscribe to such straightforward logic. In the international game, more so even than at club level, tournament soccer is more complex, more chaotic than that.

In the concentrated, intense span of a World Cup or a continental championship, the fleeting and the unforeseen take on an outsize significance. One bad game, after all, is all it takes, and years of preparation can be wasted.

A raft of injuries, or poor form, might take hold. A referee — even one with a video monitor — might make a mistake. A rival — Brazil or Argentina, Italy or France — might build a momentum so impressive it takes on the air of destiny. The best team in the world does not always win the World Cup; the best team in the world that month ordinarily does.

Whether Germany wins twice on Russian soil in two years, though — and it is worth noting both that no winner of the Confederations Cup has ever won the subsequent World Cup, and that a World Cup winner has never repeated since Brazil in 1962 — should not detract from the broader pattern its latest gilded summer has brought to the surface.

Kevin Durant passes on about $4 million of his $28 million salary next season to have room to keep Andre Iguodala and others

 Kevin Durant is set to make a new contract deal and stay with the Golden State Warriors, but the new NBA champions did lose a legendary player on Monday, June 19 (Tuesday in Manila time).

Multiple reports said Durant, the Most Valuable Player of this month’s NBA Finals triumph over Cleveland, will opt out of his contract but re-sign with Golden State in a money-saving move under NBA salary cap rules.

But the Warriors lost Jerry West, a member of the team’s executive board who on Monday was named a consultant to the Los Angeles Clippers.

The 79-year old Hall of Fame guard was an iconic star for the Los Angeles Lakers and the NBA’s logo is designed around his silhouette.

Durant, who joined the Warriors last July after finishing his contract with Oklahoma City, plans to decline his player option for the 2017-18 campaign and become an unrestricted free agent on July 1, according to reports.

The 10-year NBA veteran would then re-sign with the Warriors, the move enabling the team to have more money for contracts with forward Andre Iguodala and other players.

Durant was to be paid about $28 million in salary next season, but he will take about $4 million less than the maximum deal he could have been paid.

That will better enable the Warriors to keep together the championship roster that includes Iguodala, Shaun Livingston, Georgian center Zaza Pachulia and reserves.

Durant won his first NBA crown and helped Golden State claim a second in 3 seasons by averaging 35.2 points, 8.4 rebounds and 5.4 assists in the best-of-7 NBA Finals, which the Warriors won over Cleveland in 5 games.

Warriors guard Stephen Curry becomes a free agent, but has taken less than maximum money in recent years to set up an expected 5-year deal worth $205 million. Curry made $12.1 million last season.

West said his two-year deal to return to Los Angeles came down to being wooed by Clippers owner Steve Ballmer, coach Doc Rivers and executive vice president Lawrence Frank.

“For them to want me to come here and maybe think I can help, I am really flattered,” West said. “I think they want to establish their own identity in this town and that is what to me is most important, establish their own identity and ability to win at the very highest level.”

West spent the past 6 seasons with the Warriors. The two-time NBA executive of the year was Lakers general manager/executive vice president of basketball operations for 18 years during which the team won four NBA crowns. He also served as the president of basketball operations for the Memphis Grizzlies from 2002-2007, the team making its first 3 playoff appearances during West’s tenure.

As a player, West was a 14-time All-Star who went to the NBA Finals 9 times but won only once. He averaged 27 points, 6.7 assists and 5.8 rebounds for his career.

Support for Murray That’s Loud

Wimbledon has always been a haven for fanatical supporters, from the hordes of young women who chased Bjorn Borg around the grounds in the 1970s to the Australians who dress in yellow every year to support their countrymen and women.

Faces will be painted with the Scottish and British flags for Andy Murray over the next two weeks. But fandom can take many forms. Take a look on Twitter during a big Murray match at Wimbledon, and the chances are you will come across the commentary of Irvine Welsh, the Scottish author most famous for writing “Trainspotting,” the anarchic tale of a group of heroin addicts in Edinburgh.

The text of his tweets is often provocative, and the language usually vulgar, but his admiration for the top-ranked Murray comes across loud and clear.

Welsh, who lives in Miami, first tweeted during a Murray match when Murray beat Novak Djokovic in the 2012 United States Open final for his first Grand Slam title.

“It was something my friend and fellow Scottish writer John Niven got into doing between us for laughs,” Welsh said in an email. “Tennis commentary is generally pretty dull. Ours is grounded in the compelling perversity that the cuisine, climate and class structure of Scotland can produce a tennis champion like Murray.”

Welsh’s fandom is not just about Murray also coming from Scotland.

“I admire his incredible skills, control and pace around the court,” Welsh said. “I love how he wears the game on his face. So many players are dull and deadpan; they never change expressions whether they hit a winner or miss an easy shot.”

Many of Welsh’s tweets are unprintable, but the vast majority feature the acerbic humor that would be familiar to his readers.

“Good hold Andy son,” Welsh wrote during the 2012 U.S. Open final. “I’m going to eat a packet of McCain’s oven chips for every point you win the day pal.”