Surfing Orgs Fight Over Stand-Up Paddleboarding

Ending an argument we’re sure has happened at least once on a slow afternoon in a bar somewhere, a court will finally decide whether stand-up paddleboarding is closer to surfing or canoeing. The New York Times reports the Court of Arbitration for Sport has been asked to settle a dispute between the International Surfing Association and International Canoe Federation, both of which are fighting for control of the increasingly popular sport of stand-up paddleboarding, or SUP. The battle for control of SUP has become more urgent as the Olympics is considering adding it to future games.

The ISA argues SUP is performed on a board, like surfing; it also claims it’s been holding SUP competitions for years, Deadspin reports. The ICF counters that SUP uses a paddle. “Propulsion using a paddle is basically canoeing,” the ICF secretary general says. “Standing up or sitting down is irrelevant.” But the ISA claims the ICF is trying to jump on the bandwagon. “We have a track record of doing this,” Reuters quotes the ISA president as saying. “At the ICF now there is an interest of how they can be part of the popularity of the sport.”

Cyclist Tried Poop Doping

 It probably won’t ever become the focus of a hit sports movie—not even if they call it Poosiers—but “poop doping” is a real thing and could possibly give competitive cyclists an edge. That’s according to microbiologist and mountain biker Lauren Petersen, who tells Bicycling magazine that after being sick for more than a decade with Lyme Disease, in 2014 she gave herself an at-home fecal transplant from somebody who happened to be another racer. Petersen says she not only felt much better after the stool transplant, she upped her training to five days a week and was winning races within months, though her experience proves correlation, not causation. “I wondered if I had gotten my microbiome from a couch potato, not a racer, if I would I be doing so well,” says Petersen.

Petersen—who says the procedure was “not fun” but “pretty basic”—says she started collecting stool samples from top racers and found that a microorganism called Prevotella was found in almost all top racers but less than 10% of the general population. She is now doing more research into Prevotella, which is believed to help muscle recovery. Other experts, however, are skeptical, telling

Alex Honnold scaled granite-face El Capitan in 3 hours, 56 minutes

A California rock climber has become the first person to conquer Yosemite’s El Capitan without using ropes, USA Today reports. Alex Honnold, 31, scaled the nearly 3,000-foot peak on Saturday going free solo, meaning he didn’t use ropes, harness, or other safety equipment. “This is the ‘moon landing’ of free-soloing,” fellow climber Tommy Caldwell tells National Geographic. It’s a particularly daunting prospect since the Guardian notes the granite peak is ranked as among the most difficult, with some hand-holds the width of raisins. After stunning the climbing world with other rope-free feats, Honnold had quietly trained for his latest exploit for more than a year. After spending the night in his van, Honnold pulled on a red T-shirt, nylon pants, and sticky-soled climbing shoes.

With chalk to keep his hands dry tucked in a bag around his waist, Honnold set off at 5:32am. He made the summit three hours and 56 minutes later. “So stoked to realize a life dream today :)” he tweeted. Caldwell and a National Geographic crew were along for the climb, which they filmed for a documentary. “Alex was on fire,” Caldwell tells the mag, which called the feat the greatest

Sloane Stephens Falls Short Against Alison Riske

 Competing for the first time in 11 months, Sloane Stephens had an unfortunate draw for her opening match at Wimbledon on Tuesday: Alison Riske, a fellow American who is most comfortable on English lawns.

Riske, who is ranked 46th in the world, quickly ended the first stage of Stephens’s comeback from a foot injury with a 6-2, 7-5 win.

“Obviously, it’s a big task to play Ali in the first round,” said Stephens, 24, who has not competed since a first-round loss to Eugenie Bouchard of Canada in the Rio de Janeiro Olympics last summer. Her best surface is grass. I did the best I could. I’m pleased with — I mean, obviously, not that I didn’t win — but that I was able to get out there and I was pain-free.”

Stephens, who has succeeded on all surfaces and has been ranked as high as 11th in the world, said she did not know what to expect in her return.

“I have been practicing and playing practice sets and matches and stuff, but it’s

Olympic 100-meter swim

Rio Olympics 100-meter freestyle gold medalist Kyle Chalmers has withdrawn from July’s world swimming championships to undergo surgery for a worsening heart condition.

Chalmers has supraventricular tachycardia, or recurrent rapid heartbeat, that is normally not life-threatening but can impact on his quality of life.

“I have increasingly begun to suffer from an abnormally fast heart rhythm during training and competitions, which now requires surgery,” he said in a statement Wednesday. “I have had surgery in the past and, unfortunately, it did not work.”

The 18-year-old Chalmers said it was a difficult decision to miss the world championships in Budapest, but he did so with a longer-term view, setting his sights on the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games in 2018.

In April, he finished second to Cameron McEvoy at the Australian championships.

Swimming Australia head coach Jacco Verhaeren said athletes’ health and well-being were the priority.

“We are at the beginning of a new Olympic cycle and, for some of our athletes, we need to look at longevity to allow them to stay at the highest level for longer,” he said. “Kyle has our full support and

Victory caps team’s 50th season

Sidney Crosby is bringing the Stanley Cup back home to Pittsburgh for a second consecutive year. Patric Hornqvist scored with 1:35 left and Matt Murray made 27 saves for his second straight shutout as the Penguins became the NHL’s first team in nearly two decades to repeat as champions following a 2-0 win over the Nashville Predators in Game 6 in Nashville on Sunday night. The Detroit Red Wings in 1997 and ’98 were the last champions to defend their title, but the Penguins are the first to do it in the salary cap era, the AP reports. They will cap their 50th season with their names on the most famous silver cup in sports for the fifth time.

It is the third championship for Crosby and a handful of teammates from the 2009 title team, surpassing the two won by the Penguins teams led by current owner Mario Lemieux in the 1990s. “We knew it was going to be tough all year, but we just tried to keep with it,” says Crosby, who won his second Conn Smythe Trophy

6th-place Kentucky Derby finisher skipped Preakness, gives trainer 3rd Belmont victory

The road to the winner’s circle in the Belmont Stakes ran through the Kentucky Derby, even if the Derby and Preakness winners skipped the final leg of the Triple Crown. Tapwrit overtook favored Irish War Cry in the stretch to win by two lengths on Saturday, giving trainer Todd Pletcher his third career victory in the Belmont. He won in 2007 with filly Rags to Riches and in 2013 with Palace Malice. The first four finishers all followed a well-worn path: run in the Derby, skip the Preakness and come back fresh for the Belmont. Five of the last nine Belmont winners did just that. Tapwrit finished sixth in the 20-horse Derby after encountering traffic in what Pletcher described as “a sneaky good” race. “We felt like with the five weeks in between, and with the way this horse had trained, that he had a legitimate chance,” said Pletcher, per the AP. “I think that’s always an advantage.

Irish War Cry was 10th after pressing the early pace in the May 6 race. Patch took third in the Belmont after being 14th in the Derby. Gormley, ninth in the Derby, finished fourth Saturday. Ridden

There will be a rematch

Manny Pacquiao guaranteed a return bout with Jeff Horn Monday night, shelving calls to end a sterling ring career outright.

“There’s a rematch,” Pacquiao said after having late dinner at his mansion here.

Beaten by Horn in their showdown for the World Boxing Organization welterweight crown Sunday in Brisbane,
Pacquiao wants to exact revenge on the Australian, who roughed him up to earn a disputable unanimous
decision.

Horn said during the post-fight conference Sunday that he is willing to give Pacquiao a chance to regain the 147-pound crown anywhere, including the Philippines.

On Monday, however, when Horn was being feted in his hometown, he announced that if ever there will be a rematch, it should be held again n Brisbane.

Owing to the tremendous success of “Battle in Brisbane,” which reportedly enriched the city coffers by $25 million aside from gaining worldwide attention, Brisbane officials have endorsed Pacquiao-Horn II.

Informed of the development, Pacquiao said he won’t mind returning to Suncorp Stadium to seek revenge on Horn.

“Even in Brisbane, no problem,” said Pacquiao, who’s out for revenge. “There will be talks.”

One of the chief concerns is

Badminton crowdfunding would be a ‘huge’ boost

The sport received £5.5m in the build-up to Rio 2016, where GB’s Marcus Ellis and Chris Langridge won bronze.

However, UK Sport felt GB players – who claimed four European medals last week – were not “credible” Tokyo 2020 medal prospects and cut all support.

“A little public support could make a big difference,” said Rajiv Ouseph.

UK Sport’s funding cut – announced in late 2016 – came into effect on 1 April.

The crowdfunding campaign has been launched by Badminton England – from which the majority of the British squad are drawn.

The cut resulted in half of the 24-strong England Badminton player squad leaving, while 13 staff members – including physiotherapists and doctors – lost their jobs.

“Personally, there aren’t as many players around for me to play with now and most of the support staff we’ve had in place have left, so any help would be massive,” European singles champion Ouseph told BBC Sport.

The team’s performance director Jon Austin admits delivering the news to the squad was one of the most difficult moments of his career.

“It was a decision which could potentially end people’s dreams

The bowling out of the gutter

 

In an era a long, long time ago, Filipino tenpin bowlers were rock stars.

It was a time when a tall and dashing mestizo, Paeng Nepomuceno, loomed large as the sport’s poster boy, an era when queues of youngsters wanting to be trained by the local masters were long and the bowling centers were the “in” places to be.

Nepomuceno, Bong Coo, Lita dela Rosa, Arianne Cerdeña, Bec Watanabe and Ollie Ongtawco left for overseas competitions one after the other and came back home with  world or continental titles.

Theirs was an unparalleled two-decade (1976-1996) victory parade that made them household names, adored like the land’s basketball superstars.

Filipino bowlers crowded the Americans as the finest in the world, and the 6-foot-2 Nepomuceno exemplified the country’s preeminence with four World Cup victories, three of them coming in different decades.

But bowling’s halcyon days slowly came to an end as a series of leadership disputes and a lack of sustainable development in the sport, according to two former national team stalwarts, created thick cobwebs that smothered the sport for protracted periods.

Victories later came far